Friday, February 15, 2008
shout at the devil:
Holly wrote a great piece about the bind Howard Dean is in if the primaries don't yield a Dem nominee.
“The only thing you do right now is think,” said Don Fowler, a former DNC chairman. “I think any attempt to intervene at this time would be ill-advised.”

Fowler, who has endorsed Clinton, said there was still “an opportunity, a possibility,” that the remaining primaries and caucuses could produce a winner. But if neither Clinton nor Obama has the delegate math in their favor by the first week of June, Dean would have to deal with what he called “the real big bears in the woods,” Florida and Michigan.

The two states were stripped of their delegates when they defied the DNC and held early primaries. The candidates did not campaign in those states and Clinton won both races, although Obama’s name did not appear on the Michigan ballot.

The Clinton campaign plans to ask its delegates from other states to seat the disputed delegations, and underscores how important a unified Democratic Party is in those two states, which are often critical in presidential contests. “We believe the people of Florida and Michigan have voted and their preferences ought to be honored,” Howard Wolfson, Clinton’s communications director, told reporters this week.

But David Plouffe, Obama’s campaign manager, accused the Clinton campaign of trying to rewrite the rules to suit its interests. “I don’t think there is a lot of appetite for that out in the country,” Plouffe told reporters “I don’t think there is a lot of appetite for that at the DNC.”

Gary Hart, a Democratic candidate for president in 1984 and 1988, agreed that Dean should be working hard to resolve the dispute. “He needs to be exploring options – hourly,” Hart said. Hart proposed that Dean move quickly to appoint an ad hoc group of party elders to study the situation and report back to him in three or four weeks about possible ways to resolve it.
--Spencer Ackerman
"The Clinton campaign plans to ask its delegates from other states to seat the disputed delegations, and underscores how important a unified Democratic Party is in those two states, which are often critical in presidential contests."

Yes, a unified Democratic party is omnipotent, but her argument is bass ackwards and she knows it. If seating the Michigan and Florida Delegates awards her the nomination (against the popular vote and otherwise, the delegate count) she would without question divide the party.
Blogger Jeff Dexter | 8:38 AM

I have a solution to the Michigan/Florida problem. Seat Florida, but only Michigan's Uncommitted. Reasons and numbers are detailed in my post here.
Blogger Quiddity | 1:26 PM